How-To

Sometimes a little advice can make a task easier. After all, tiny teardrop trailers have been around a long time, which means camper owners have been around using them for a long time. The articles below have been pulled from Green Goddess Glamping's archives and compiled here for your education and pleasure. Most of these "how-to's" are the result of not only experience but also research. They are listed chronologically, the most recent at the top.

Tiny Trailer Security: the Valentino Approach
Occasionally I run across an online social media post that provides a focused, unified examination of a particular topic of interest to tiny trailer campers. My latest find is on trailer security, explaining a multi-options approach to dissuading thieves. This married couple's approach to discouraging someone stealing their tiny trailer addresses the hitch, the receiver, and the wheels. Without further explanation, here is the "Valentino Approach." <more>

How to Weatherize Your RTTC Camper
Although this article is specific to a particular camper brand, the concepts of how and where to find and plug air leaks in your camper still apply to everyone. The principles apply to both heating and cooling, although this article explains the process in terms of keeping that good ol' ac cool air inside. If you are looking for winter solutions for keeping the heat inside, then also consider the article on condensation below. <more>

Minimizing Condensation in a Teardrop or Tiny Trailer
Living in a tiny trailer means living in a tiny space. Although this is obvious, the issue is not just one of whether you feel cramped or cozy. Human beings give off moisture. Combustible heating methods create moisture. The differential between outside temperature and inside temperature can create a "dew point" moment inside your camper . . . to your soggy dismay. This article discusses the what, why, and how to minimize excessive moisture in your tiny trailer. <more>

The Consistent and Loud Case Against Bathrooms in Tiny Campers
This is a second article on toilets and tiny campers, the first listed below this one. It also is one of the highest viewed of my articles. As I mention in the introduction of this article: "It appears that regarding the topic of biological functions, we tiny campers are always curious about variations on the 'poo in the loo' theme." Two other articles are referenced (authored by women), and several brands of portable toilets are mentioned. <more>

Cooking over Your Campfire: It's More Than Pretty
Cooking over your campfire is a camp lifestyle filled with history and romance--and it's impressive as all get-out and also way cool. I researched this article because of my wife's and my interest. I was lucky to enlist the aid of experienced camp cooks, so the article is one part research and one part experienced advice. I was also able to locate some interesting links and video demonstrations. Also, if you like this article, you'll probably also like my article on a Dutch oven cook-off, which features two award-winning cooks. <more>

Watt's the Problem? Tiny Trailer Electrical Issues
This article is especially relevant to tiny trailers that are wired for 15 amps. My trailer is wired for 12v for lights, using energy converted from the 110v extension cord and plug-in box system. The danger such a system has is to use too many appliances so that the extension cord and boxes are over-taxed, resulting in fire danger. In this article, I walk myself through my trailer's cord and box capacity and then add up the various watts used. <more>

Keeping Organized in a Tiny Trailer
Anyone who has lived for a length of time in a tiny trailer has faced the issue of how to live in an extremely small space with all your stuff, which is, of course, multiplied if you're not traveling alone. This article is not so much about gear as it is about how to manage all that gear so that you still have room to turn around . . . or sit down. Several common-sense yet often overlooked ideas are discussed. <more>

Cold Weather Cooking in a Tall Teardrop
I prefer cooking outside; indeed, I prefer moving as much of my camping experience outside as possible. However, a main reason for buying a tiny trailer was to extend the camping season and to not cancel or shorten camping trips because of heat, cold, humidity, precipitation, bugs, wind, or other factors. We have portable camp tables for setting up our outdoor kitchen, and the outdoor experience is quite enjoyable. <more>

Stabilizing Your Tiny Trailer: A Few Essentials
One of my first steps as a tiny trailer owner was to buy and use the gizmos that kept the trailer from rocking and rolling. The whole experience of being inside changes when the little rig doesn't sway when you move around in it. Over time, the few steps of stabilizing a trailer have become routine during set-up--quick and easy. Leveling and stabilizing a trailer just takes a few basic moves, discussed in this article. <more>

Toilet or No Toilet for a Tiny Camper?
Yep, this is my number 1 most-read article, with over 20% more page views than any other article. "Why?" I ask myself. "What's the magic of this article--not the photos, for goodness sake!" I think the article strongly taps into the psyche of tiny camper owners. We want our camp routines to be functional, neat and clean. We want our "little bedroom on wheels" to be just that--not our portable toilet on wheels, and this attitude is one understood even by those open to having an inside toilet/shower. <more>

Security: A Starter Pack for New Teardrop Owners
Any trailer or vehicle can be stolen if the thief has the time, equipment, experience, and motivation. Securing your tiny trailer usually interferes with one of those four--and hopefully more than one--causing the would-be thief to give up and move on. This article is all about providing information that will lead you to devices that will slow down a potential thief and make that thief decide to try some less risky rig. <more>

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(Note: As the content for Green Goddess Glamping evolves, sometimes content focus will dictate that articles will be posted on some Facebook groups and not others. Articles on Dutch oven cooking, portable toilets, or bicycle day rides, for instance, could find posts in different groups. The best way to ensure that you are receiving all articles is to subscribe to follow this blog by email notifications.)

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